Frequently Asked Questions

CASE INFORMATION
CHANGES DURING PLAN
CREDITORS AND DEBTS
EXPECTATIONS
PAYMENTS
PLAN
PROPERTY
TAXES

If you have just filed a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy, you probably have a lot of questions! The following series of "Questions and Answers" is provided to you only for the purposes of orientation and to give you some idea of what to expect. THE BANKRUPTCY CODE WILL DETERMINE WHAT ACTUALLY HAPPENS IN YOUR CASE. You need to discuss with your attorney your individual concerns, legal rights, and specific questions about your particular situation, and how the Bankruptcy Code will affect your case. The Chapter 13 Trustee and her staff will help you implement your Plan. However, the Trustee’s office CANNOT GIVE YOU ANY LEGAL ADVICE!


Case Information

What is my chapter 13 bankruptcy number?
Who is my Trustee? How do I contact Her?
When will I have to appear in court? Where?
I am in need of translation or interpretation services for a hearing. How do I set these up?
"My friend went through bankruptcy and she says..."

What is my chapter 13 bankruptcy case number?
At the time your Chapter 13 petition was filed, the Bankruptcy Clerk assigned your case a number.  This number is very important.  You will need your case number whenever you write to the Trustee's office or make payments to the Trustee.  The Notice of Commencement of Case mailed by the Bankruptcy Court provides your case number.  An example of this case number is 04:10-bk-00001.

Who is my Trustee? How do I contact Her?
Your Trustee is Dianne Crandell Kerns.  Her mailing address is located at 7320 N. Lacholla Blvd #154  P.M.B# 413, Tucson, Arizona 85741.  This office is open from 9:00AM to 4:00PM.  The phone number to your trustee's office is (520) 544-9094.  The fax number to the office is (520) 989-6269.  You can email your questions to mail@dcktrustee.com.

When will I have to appear in court? Where?
In the District of Arizona you will have to appear for a hearing at least ince, for a First Meeting of Creditors. This hearing is conducted by the Chapter 13 Trustee. The Bankruptcy Judge wil NOT be present. In fact, the Judge is prohibited by law from attending this hearing. The meeting will be held about 30 to 45 days after your case is filed. Your testimony as this hearing should not be lengthy. You are required to bring with you a government issued photo identification AND an ORIGINAL document evidencing your social security number, such as your social security card, military identification or Medicare card. Tax returns and drivers licenses cannot be used for this purpose. Arizona no longer automatically sets a confirmation hearing so, unless the Court orders otherwise, you will not have to attend a confirmation hearing.

Click here for maps and information on the different locations for the meeting of creditors.

I am in need of translation or interpretation services for a hearing. How do I set these up?
The United States Trustee offers interpretation services at no cost for those with hearing impairments or limited English proficiency. No advance preparation is needed.

To request a sign language interpreter, or assisted listening device for the meeting of creditors, contact Ms. Lana LeDuc at The Office of the United States Trustee by calling 602-682-2609. Please make these arrangements no later than 7 business days prior to the meeting.

To request a sign language interpreter at a hearing before a bankruptcy judge, contact the Administrative Services Department at the Office of the United States Trustee by calling 602-682-4139.

Please contact the office of the United States Trustee for all other language services using the information below.

Office of The United States Trustee
230 N. 1st Avenue
Suite 204
Phoenix, AZ 85003
Phone: (602) 682-2600
Facsimile: (602) 514-7270
Website

"My friend went through bankruptcy and she says..."
You have probably already received or you will receive advice on what to do from well-meaning friends and relatives who have themselves experienced financial problems. Just like no two people are alike, no two "Chapter 13 Bankruptcies" are alike. Take the advice of your well-meaning friends and acquaintances with the proverbial "grain of salt." If you have a specific question about anything related to your bankruptcy, make it a rule to ASK YOUR ATTORNEY, and your attorney will try to provide you with an answer that applies to your special situation.

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Changes During Plan

I've moved. What do I need to do?
I've married and changed my name. What do I need to do?
I forgot to list a creditor on my schedules. What happens?

I've moved. What do I need to do?
We need to know your exact mailing address for as long as you are under Chapter 13 protection. We have the address which you put on your petition, and we will send all notices to that address until you or your attorney notify the Trustee’s office in writing to send them somewhere else. If you ever move or change your mailing address, you must immediately inform your attorney, the Court and the Trustee in writing of your new address. You can get the appropriate change of address form here.

I've married and changed my name. What do I need to do?
Please continue to reference the name with which you've filed bankruptcy on any payments or correspondence with our office.

I forgot to list a creditor on my schedules. What happens?
Creditors not listed by you can cause quite a few problems. There are two kinds of unlisted creditors: those who were owed money at the time of filing but were forgotten ("unlisted creditors") and those creditors who have a bill that was incurred after you filed ("post-petition creditors"). If you find an unlisted creditor, you should let your attorney know the details immediately so that they can amend (correct) the proper schedule.

Only two types of debts incurred after filing of the case (post-petition debts) may be included in a Chapter 13 Plan:

          (1) debts for taxes that become payable while the case is pending, and

          (2) consumer debts arising after the filing of the case that are for property or services necessary for the                          debtor's performance under the Plan and that are approved in advance by the Chapter 13 Trustee.

Post-petition creditors should be rare, because you cannot borrow money or run up a bill under Chapter 13 without the consent of the Trustee. However, some medical expenses may arise. Post-petition debts should be brought to the attention of your attorney so that a review of the Plan can be made.

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Creditors and Debts

Can my creditors contact me during or after a bankruptcy?
What effect does filing under chapter 13 have on lawsuits and attachments previously filed against me?
Will my creditors be able to take my property while the chapter 13 case is in effect?
How must secured creditors be treated under the chapter 13 plan?
How do I handle secured creditors to whom I am in default?
What debts may be repaid under a chapter 13 plan?
Must all of my debts be completely paid off under a chapter 13 plan?
How are debts that have been co-signed or guaranteed by another person handled under chapter 13?
May I repay some of my unsecured creditors and not others under chapter 13?
What debts are dischargeable under chapter 13?

Can my creditors contact me during or after a bankruptcy?
You should not be contacted by creditors during or after a bankruptcy. The automatic stay which goes into effect upon the filing of your bankruptcy case prohibits all creditors listed in the paperwork from contacting you and your employer.

Inform your attorney of any mailed notices from creditors. If you receive direct contact from a creditor, you may provide them with your case number, date of filing, and the names and addresses of your attorney and trustee.

Once your Chapter 13 plan is completely paid, you should not receive requests for additional money. If you do, contact your attorney.

What effect does filing under chapter 13 have on lawsuits and attachments previously filed against me?
The filing of a Chapter 13 case automatically stays (stops) all lawsuits, attachments, garnishments, and other actions by creditors against either you or your property. A few days after the case is filed, a notice is mailed by the Court to all your creditors advising them of the automatic stay. The creditors may be notified sooner by either you or your attorney, if necessary. However, the bankruptcy stay does not stop a government’s criminal action or a divorce, but not the division of property.

Will my creditors be able to take my property while the chapter 13 case is in effect?
No. The automatic stay described in the previous question remains in effect during the entire Chapter 13 case, and your creditors will not be permitted to take or otherwise proceed against any of your property or assets, including your earnings. However, if secured creditors to whom you are in default are not being paid under the Plan, they may go to Court and get permission to repossess the property upon which they have a valid lien.

How must secured creditors be treated under the chapter 13 plan?
The Court may confirm your plan when you provide in your Plan that secured creditors:

          (1) have accepted the plan;

          (2) are allowed to retain the lien securing their collateral;

          (3) receive the value of their secured claim under the plan; or

          (4) are given back their collateral.

It is important to realize that most secured creditors are considered to a have secured claim only to the extent of the value of the security, which usually cannot exceed the value of the property securing the claim. For example, if a secured creditor has a lien on your car, and if the car has a replacement value of $500.00, then that creditor has a secured claim for only $500.00 regardless of how much you may owe the creditor.

How do I handle secured creditors to whom I am in default?
Defaults to secured creditors, such as mortgage arrears, may be cured (brought current) wihtin a reasonable time under your Chapter 13 plan. If you are behind on your mortgage, or if you fall behind during your Chapter 13 case, you are required to make your regular mortgage payments through your Chapter 13 plan. Failure to make the payments through the plan can result in your case being dismissed.

What debts may be repaid under a chapter 13 plan?
Any debts whatsoever, whether they are priority, secured or unsecured may be paid thru a Chapter 13 Plan. Even nondischargeable debts, such as debts for unpaid taxes, and debts for alimony, maintenance or support may be dealt with and repaid within a reasonable time under Chapter 13. Debts are placed into categories and one category may have to be paid before another one.

Must all of my debts be completely paid off under a chapter 13 plan?
No. While most secured debts dealt with under the Plan must be paid in full, at least to the extent that they are secured, only the portion of unsecured debts that you can reasonably afford to repay out of all your disposable income over the period of the Plan needs to be paid off. The unpaid balance of most unsecured debts will be discharged upon completion of the Plan.

How are debts that have been co-signed or guaranteed by another person handled under chapter 13?
If you have co-signed on a loan for someone else, you may be required to surrender your interest in the property securing the loan. If someone else has co-signed on a loan for your benefit, you may be allowed to pay that loan as a priority. Talk with your attorney about such claims.

May I repay some of my unsecured creditors and not others under chapter 13?
Generally, you may not discriminate between claims of a similar type. You cannot selectively pick and choose some particular creditors and decide to pay them "on the side," because ALL of your debts must be dealt with through the Court. Any payment which you make to a creditor must be paid under the authority of the Court, by the terms of the law, and not by any personal desires. If you want to pay creditors, most of them must be paid through your Chapter 13 Plan.

What debts are dischargeable under chapter 13?
There are two types of Chapter 13 discharges. One is given if the approved plan is not successfully completed due to circumstances for which the debtor should not be justly held accountable. This "hardship" discharge does not discharge as many debts as a full Chapter 13 discharge and is similar to a Chapter 7 discharge. The other discharge is given upon the debtor's successful completion of a plan and discharges the debtor from all debts dealt with under the Plan except certain debts such as alimony, maintenance for support, or home mortgages extending longer than a Chapter 13 Plan. Please get competent legal advice if you have to know specifically which of your debts will be discharged. You will continue to be responsible for all debts incurred after the filing of the bankruptcy, such as continuing medical costs and post-petition taxes.

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Expectations

What does my chapter 13 trustee expect of me?
What may I expect from the chapter 13 trustee?
What should I expect my attorney to do in a chapter 13 bankruptcy?
What if I do not have an attorney?

What does my chapter 13 trustee expect of me?
The Trustee expects you to be cooperative and truthful. You should ask questions when you do not understand any aspect of the administration of your case. You should direct your questions to your attorney before contacting the Trustee. Please notify the Trustee's office promptly if you change your address, telephone number or employment status. Do not incur new debt or enter into leases without the Bankruptcy Court and/or the Chapter 13 Trustee first approving, this includes student loans.Finally, the Chapter 13 Trustee expects you to handle your plan payments in a prompt, regular and business-like manner.

What may I expect from the chapter 13 trustee?
The Chapter 13 Trustee's office is open five days a week, Monday through Friday, from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM. We follow the federal holiday schedule. Our phone number is (520) 544-9094. If you have a nonlegal question which your attorney CANNOT answer, you may wish to ask the Trustee by writing a letter or email with your case number and your question. If you cannot wait for a written response, you may call the Trustee's office during office hours. DO NOT FEEL THAT YOU HAVE TO TALK PERSONALLY WITH THE TRUSTEE; HER STAFF IS FAMILIAR WITH THE TRUSTEE’S POLICIES AND GUIDELINES AND IS WELL QUALIFIED TO DISCUSS WITH YOU ANY PROBLEMS YOU MAY HAVE WITH IMPLEMENTING YOUR PLAN. THE TRUSTEE AND HER STAFF CANNOT, AND WILL NOT, GIVE YOU LEGAL ADVICE. If you have any questions regarding the legal aspects of your case, you should consult an attorney.

What should I expect my attorney to do in a chapter 13 bankruptcy?
Exactly what you may expect of your attorney will be governed by whatever agreement the two of you have made. Be sure that you and your attorney have discussed fully whether additional legal services during your plan will cost you more money or whether your initial fee will cover all legal services. Keep in mind that all legal fees must be reviewed and approved by the Bankruptcy Judge even if you agree to pay more. If you have any dispute with your lawyer, try to work it out.

Under the rules of the Bankruptcy Court, your attorney must continue to appear and represent you until the Judge permits your attorney to withdraw from your case. If you ever change attorneys, your new attorney must notify the Court and the Trustee. You can hire another attorney to substitute for your current one. However, if the previous attorney no longer represents you, you may still owe attorney fees for the work done.

What if I do not have an attorney?
If you do not have an attorney, you are considered a "Pro Se" debtor. This simply means that you represent yourself. If you have any questions regarding the legal aspects of your case, you should consult an attorney. The Trustee cannot give you any legal advice. The law presumes that a Pro Se debtor knows the bankruptcy laws and rules of procedure as well as an attorney would.

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Payments

Where do I mail my chapter 13 payments?
How soon do I begin making my chapter 13 plan payments? How often must they be made?
How can I keep track of my chapter 13 plan payments? How do I find out how much is owed to creditors under my plan?
What if I make my payments late?
What if I am temporarily unable to make my chapter 13 plan payment?
May I make a higher payment than is required under my plan?
What if I decide that I no longer want to make payments and continue with the chapter 13 plan?
What happens when all payments have been completed?

Where do I mail my chapter 13 payments?
SEND YOUR PAYMENTS TO:
Dianne C. Kerns
P.O. Box 366
Memphis, TN 38101-0366

DO NOT send your payments by FedEx, UPS, or other expedited courier. First Class mail is the quickest way to make your payments, even if you are making your payment late. DO NOT send your payments by certified mail or any other delivery that requires a signature.

How soon do I begin making my chapter 13 plan payments? How often must they be made?
Most Chapter 13 plan payments are made directly to the Trustee's P.O. Box address by cashier's check or money order. Be sure to include your name and your case number on each payment. Payments are also accepted through tfs - Online Bill Pay. THE CHAPTER 13 TRUSTEE WILL NOT ACCEPT CASH, OR PERSONAL CHECKS, OR ONLINE BILLPAY CHECKS.

Usually, the first payment should be made to the Chapter 13 Trustee within 30 days of your filing bankruptcy and then every month thereafter until your Plan has been completed.

Do not send plan payments to the Clerk of the Bankruptcy Court or your attorney.  If secured creditors are being paid through the Trustee, do not send your payment coupons. It is a good idea to keep all your receipts from your cashier's checks or money orders in order to verify that payments are being made if there is ever a dispute. Do not pay Court fees to the Trustee.

How can I keep track of my chapter 13 plan payments? How do I find out how much is owed to creditors under my plan?
Most people are very interested in knowing how much they owe to their creditors and how much they have left to pay on their Chapter 13 plan. For the most up to date information, you can check the status of your plan payments and disbursements at the National Data Center.

Alternatively, if you want to find out how much each creditor is owed and what your payoff balance is on your Chapter 13 plan, please write to the Trustee's office and ask for a Printed Case Inquiry

In May of each year the Trustee's office will send you an "Annual Report" of what has been paid to all your creditors, whether you request it or not. Be sure to review the report carefully and contact your attorney if you have any questions or concerns. The report will list the amount you have paid into your Plan, the total amount required to be paid into your Plan (not including any tax refunds that may be required), the amount that has been paid to the Trustee, the amount of the claim of each creditor, the amount that has been paid on the principal and the amount of interest that has been paid. It will not include any unmatured interest which your Plan may require you to pay or any as yet unpaid Trustee fees.

What if I make my payments late?
If you make your payments after the due date stated in your Plan, or if you miss payments, additional interest may accrue on your secured debts, since the payment may not reach the Trustee's office in time for our monthly disbursement to your creditors. This may result in a funding shortfall at the end of your Plan. If your Plan does not provide enough money to pay your creditors as set forth in your Plan due to the accrual of additional interest or claims that come in higher than scheduled, you will be required to pay the additional amount necessary to complete your Plan before it can be discharged. In order to avoid a funding shortfall and paying additional money into the Plan, be sure to make all your payments on or before due date. Please note, however, that if you become two or more months delinquent on payments, you run the risk of having your case dismissed. Please contact your attorney if you are having trouble making your payments.

What if I am temporarily unable to make my chapter 13 plan payment?
If you are temporarily out of work, injured or otherwise unable to make the payments required by your Plan, you may wish to contact your attorney about asking the Court to suspend the proceeding until you are able to resume your payments. If it appears that there will be a long term problem, your attorney may amend your Plan or the case may be dismissed or converted to Chapter 7. It is very important to contact your attorney immediately if you expect to miss a payment due to a layoff, illness, etc. REMEMBER: THE TRUSTEE'S OFFICE HAS NO AUTHORITY TO LET YOU PERMANENTLY MISS A PAYMENT OR ALLOW YOU TO PAY LESS THAN YOUR PLAN REQUIRES. ONLY THE JUDGE CAN MAKE SUCH A DECISION. The Trustee's office will file a Motion to Dismiss your case if you cannot meet the obligations of your Plan.

May I make a higher payment than is required under my plan?
If you are ever in a position where you wish to increase your payments to the Trustee, even if only by a few dollars a month, this may have a big impact on finishing your Plan ahead of time. Paying a little more than required will reduce interest costs, administrative expenses and will cause Plan payments to end that much sooner. If you ever wish to permanently increase your Plan payments, contact your attorney. If you wish to make a single extra payment, you may do so by sending a money order or cashier's check. Please be sure to include your case number on the payment. If you decide to pay more than is required per month, you are still required to make the minimum payments each month thereafter. REMEMBER: ALL PLANS MUST GO FOR A MINIMUM OF 36 MONTHS OR PAY 100%.

What if I decide that I no longer want to make payments and continue with the chapter 13 plan?
The Bankruptcy law allows a debtor to either dismiss a Chapter 13 case or convert it to Chapter 7 at any time, regardless of his or her reason for doing so. No one can force you to remain in a Chapter 13 Plan if you do not wish to do so. If you desire to stop your case, contact your attorney. Your request for dismissal or conversion of your case must be in WRITING and sent to the Bankruptcy Court.

However, if you simply stop making the Chapter 13 payments, any creditor in your case may ask the Court to dismiss you case. The Trustee WILL ask the Court to dismiss your case if: (1) you fail to make your plan payments 60 days after your meeting of creditors and/or (2) if you fail to make your required payments regularly during any month of your Plan. Keep in mind that the Trustee and the Court are not creditors. The Trustee is just carrying out her duty to administer the Plan you voluntarily filed and in which you gave the Court jurisdiction over your future income under the Plan. If you fail to make your Plan payments, the case cannot be administered as ordered by the Court and the Trustee must request dismissal.

You should understand that a DISMISSAL WILL REACTIVATE all unpaid and disputed debts, all interest and finance charges, all late charges not allowed by the Bankruptcy Court, and all debts of creditors who did not file their claims. Once the case is dismissed, all your creditors will be free to pursue their legal rights to collect on their debts. Consider also that you will be forced to deal with them on their terms, not yours or the Court's.

What happens when all payments have been completed?
After you have successfully completed your Plan - that is, when the Trustee has received the money from you to pay your creditors what you promised to pay them through your Plan - you will receive notice of completion of payments and a notice of your discharge. After you receive the discharge, you will generally not owe any debts, other than alimony, child support, mortgage payments and taxes. If you are not sure which of your debts will be discharged, you should discuss that with your attorney when you meet with him or her. You may also receive a small refund check if there is any excess paid into your Plan. Refunds usually take 60 days to process. The Trustee does not have the ability to expedite the refund process.

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Plan

May a creditor file a plan and enforce it against me?
What is a confirmation? What is required for confirmation of a chapter 13 plan?
What if the court does not approve my chapter 13 plan?
How is the amount of my payment determined?

May a creditor file a plan and enforce it against me?
It is the responsibility of the debtor and his or her attorney to come up with a WORKABLE Chapter 13 Plan.

What is a confirmation? What is required for confirmation of a chapter 13 plan?
Confirmation is court approval of your proposed chapter 13 repayment plan. The Court will confirm a Chapter 13 plan if:

(a) the plan complies with the requirements of Chapter 13 generally;

(b) all required fees, charges, and deposits have been made;

(c) the plan has been proposed in good faith;

(d) each secured creditor has:

(1) accepted the plan;

(2) is given back their collateral;

(3) is allowed to retain their lien on his collateral; or

(4) is paid the full amount of the secured claim under the plan;

(e) each unsecured creditor will receive under the plan at least as much as the creditor would have received if you had filed Chapter 7; and

(f) it appears that the debtor will be able to make the required payments and to comply with the plan.

  

What if the court does not approve my chapter 13 plan?
If the Court will not confirm your Chapter 13 plan that you have proposed, you may either modify the plan and seek Court approval of the modified plan, convert the case to Chapter 7, or dismiss the case.

How is the amount of my payment determined?
Your Plan payment amount is determined by a number of conditions, such as the amount of money required to pay your creditors claims, the amount of equity you may have in property, and the amount of your disposable income.

In order to ensure that you comply with this condition, you are required to provide the Trustee with up-to-date information regarding your income and living expenses on a yearly basis during the first three years of your Plan. However, if there is a significant change in your income prior to the annual update, you must report the income change to the Trustee's office immediately. The Trustee will then review the information and determine if any change is required in your Plan payment amount. Failure to inform the Trustee of these changes may be a basis for dismissal of your case.

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Property

Will I lose any of my property under chapter 13?
Can I buy property or incur new debt while I am in a chapter 13 bankruptcy?
Can I sell property while I'm in a chapter 13?
Where do I obtain title to my property after completion of my chapter 13?

Will I lose any of my property under chapter 13?
Usually not. Under Chapter 13, your debts are normally repaid out of the payments made to the Chapter 13 Trustee and not out of your property. However, if you have considerable nonexempt property and cannot make sufficient payments to repay enough of your debts to satisfy the Court, some of your property may have to be used to pay creditors. However, if a secured creditor is not being paid under the Plan, the creditor may be permitted to repossess the property securing the claim if you are in default on the debt. Also, if you have nonexempt property and cannot afford to repay your creditors enough, then the Trustee may want to sell your property.

Can I buy property or incur new debt while I am in a chapter 13 bankruptcy?
Debt during a chapter 13 should be rare because you cannot borrow money or run up a bill while in a chapter 13 case, unless you first obtain the consent of the Bankruptcy Court and/or the Chapter 13 Trustee. This prohibition includes student loans; however, some emergency medical expenses may be unavoidable. Post-petition debts should be brought to the attention of your attorney so that a review of the Chapter 13 Plan can be done.

If you need to purchase a new home or vehicle while in a chapter 13 case, contact your attorney and they will assist you in obtaining the required approval.

Can I sell property while I'm in a chapter 13?
If you want to sell your property, trade in your car, or sell your home, be sure to discuss it with your attorney. Generally you cannot dispose of any of your property, including land, without Court approval. If you dispose of your property without permission, the transaction may be set aside.

Where do I obtain title to my property after completion of my chapter 13?
When a creditor has had his claim paid according to your Chapter 13 Plan, whether partially or in full, the creditor should, and usually does, send the "paid in full" papers to you. Contact the creditor holding the title, not the Trustee's office, to obtain your titles. If you receive any request for additional money after your Plan is completed, do not pay without first talking to your attorney.

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Taxes

What do I do with my most recently filed tax returns (forms)?
Where do I mail copies of my tax returns?
I have to turn over my tax refunds. Where do I mail them?
What about my income tax refunds going forward? Do I need to turn these over?
I lost the requested pre-filing tax returns and W-2s. Where do I get duplicates?
What if I haven't been filing my taxes?
What if I'm not required to file taxes?

What do I do with my most recently filed tax returns (forms)?
The Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 (BAPCPA) amended 11 U.S.C. §521(e)(2) to require that a debtor provide to the trustee a copy of the two most recently filed federal and state tax returns seven days before the meeting of creditors. Please ensure that all but the last 4 digits of any social security numbers are redacted on all tax returns sent to the trustee's office. Also ensure that any bank account information is completely redacted. If the returns are not provided, the court is directed by the Code to dismiss the case.

You are required to send your tax returns to the Trustee every year after they are filed. Please be sure you redact social security numbers, names of minor children, and bank account information. If you fail to submit your tax return each year, your case may be dismissed.

Where do I mail copies of my tax returns?

SEND YOUR TAX RETURNS TO:
Dianne C. Kerns
7320 N. La Cholla Blvd. # 154
P.M.B. #413
Tucson, AZ 85741

I have to turn over my tax refunds. Where do I mail them?
If you receive a check directly from IRS or Arizona Department of Revenue, make sure to endorse the check before mailing it to the payment address.
Alternatively, if you have had your refunds directly deposited into your account, you will need to send certified funds (cashier’s check or money order). If only including one check, make sure to specify how much of the check is for your federal refund and how much of the check is for your state refund.

SEND YOUR TAX REFUNDS TO:
Dianne C. Kerns
7320 N. La Cholla Blvd. # 154
P.M.B. #413
Tucson, AZ 85741

What about my income tax refunds going forward? Do I need to turn these over?
Generally, the Trustee requires that you turnover that portion of your tax refunds that exceed $1,000.  If your plan provides for payment of tax refunds to the Trustee, she will apply them according to your plan. 

I lost the requested pre-filing tax returns and W-2s. Where do I get duplicates?
If you need a W-2 or 1099: Contact your employer or former employer for duplicate copies. If they are unable to provide them, you may call the IRS at 1-800-829-1040 to speak with a Taxpayer Assistor.
You can go to your local IRS office and get a printout of income information for the last three years which will show your reported income and the federal

Arizona Department of Revenue
If you need W-2 or 1099: Contact your employer or former employer for duplicate copies. If they are unable to provide them, you will need to contact the IRS (see above).

What if I haven't been filing my taxes?
11 U.S.C. §1308(a) requires debtors to file all unfiled tax returns for the 4-year period prior to the petition date. These returns must be filed no later than the day before the first Meeting of Creditors. Failure to do so may result in a dismissal of your case pursuant to 11 U.S.C. §1307(e) and Local Rule 2084-5. In order to provide proof of filing, you should hand-deliver the returns (make sure to notify the front-desk staff that the returns need to be sent to the bankruptcy unit). You should take two extra copies to be date-stamped, so that one copy can then be provided to the Trustee and one kept for your records. These returns need to be filed with the local bankruptcy units:

Internal Revenue Service
300 W. Congress
Tucson, AZ 85701

Arizona Department of Revenue
400 W. Congress
Tucson, AZ 85701

For IRS forms: Call 1-800-829-3676 or download them from the internet at www.IRS.gov. Please be aware that forms sent by mail can take seven to fifteen days to arrive.

For Arizona Department of Revenue forms: Download them from the internet at www.AZDOR.gov.

What if I'm not required to file taxes?
If you believe that you were not required to file tax returns for certain year(s), then you or your attorney must prepare an Affidavit signed under penalty of perjury, notarized, and dated, stating the reason why no return was filed. The Affidavit should list income for all sources, both taxable and non-taxable for each year. The Affidavit must be delivered or sent to the above addresses, not the regional servicing centers.

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